Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

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Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:03 pm

Can anyone suggest something more sticky than Metzler for good weather conditions 4-32C temp ranges?

I think Metzler is somewhat sub standard.

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Fry » Mon Jun 19, 2017 6:51 pm

I like the Pirelli Diablo Rosso III's

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:02 pm

Fry wrote:I like the Pirelli Diablo Rosso III's

What about Super Corsa?

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Fry » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:05 pm

I may infact get a set of those to try as they seem to have a tremendous mount of grip however a lot of reviews say they are horrible, if not down right dangerous if caught in the rain, and they do wear out quicker.

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Super Duke Rob » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:09 pm

you could try the Continental Sport Attack 3, the grip is outstanding, I like themImage

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:34 pm

Super Duke Rob wrote:you could try the Continental Sport Attack 3, the grip is outstanding, I like them

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Interesting!

I used to have this on S1000RR, but back then I didnt really ride aggressive enough to understand how they like.

Have you compared them to Diablo Rosso III ?

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby 5150 Pops » Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:19 am

@dukebadboy how much do you weigh, and what psi are you running in your tires?

Metzler and Pirelli, are sister companies owned by a Chinese conglomerate. Years ago Pirelli was Italian and Metzler was German.

They share compounds now, tread patterns are mostly what sets them apart.
You might be running too high pressure for the way you are riding your bike, especially if you are a lighter rider (160 lbs or less).

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:36 am

5150 Pops wrote:@dukebadboy how much do you weigh, and what psi are you running in your tires?

Metzler and Pirelli, are sister companies owned by a Chinese conglomerate. Years ago Pirelli was Italian and Metzler was German.

They share compounds now, tread patterns are mostly what sets them apart.
You might be running too high pressure for the way you are riding your bike, especially if you are a lighter rider (160 lbs or less).

Me and the luggage are probably 200lbs. I do run 38psi on both. Is it too much?

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Adoligy69 » Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:13 am

dukebadboy wrote:
5150 Pops wrote:@dukebadboy how much do you weigh, and what psi are you running in your tires?

Metzler and Pirelli, are sister companies owned by a Chinese conglomerate. Years ago Pirelli was Italian and Metzler was German.

They share compounds now, tread patterns are mostly what sets them apart.
You might be running too high pressure for the way you are riding your bike, especially if you are a lighter rider (160 lbs or less).

Me and the luggage are probably 200lbs. I do run 38psi on both. Is it too much?

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I would think thats ok for the back your a big guy ... but might drop the front a little...i have been surprised how much difference there is between tyre gauges ....we have 4 now and they all read differently ....we have just bought a digital gauge ( topeak ) and it seems to be easier to use with a more accurate consistent reading ...
Ado

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Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:39 am

Adoligy69 wrote:[quote="dukebadboy"][quote="5150 Pops"]@dukebadboy how much do you weigh, and what psi are you running in your tires?

Metzler and Pirelli, are sister companies owned by a Chinese conglomerate. Years ago Pirelli was Italian and Metzler was German.

They share compounds now, tread patterns are mostly what sets them apart.
You might be running too high pressure for the way you are riding your bike, especially if you are a lighter rider (160 lbs or less).

Me and the luggage are probably 200lbs. I do run 38psi on both. Is it too much?

Sent from my MIX using Tapatalk[/quote]
I would think thats ok for the back your a big guy ... but might drop the front a little...i have been surprised how much difference there is between tyre gauges ....we have 4 now and they all read differently ....we have just bought a digital gauge ( topeak ) and it seems to be easier to use with a more accurate consistent reading ...
Ado[/quote]
Well, I'm 180lbs without clothes :) is it too big?


I have same problem with gauges actually. I used to use Oxford tire pressure gauge, but it stopped giving me reliable readings.

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Bagsweat » Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:16 pm

Love the M7RR's. Get your pressures dialled in.

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Tue Jun 20, 2017 1:23 pm

Bagsweat wrote:Love the M7RR's. Get your pressures dialled in.

What pressure do you have?

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Fry » Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:39 pm

I use the digital Motion Pro Air Gauge.

I run 34 PSI cold in the Pirelli's...Might go a bit lower.

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Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby 5150 Pops » Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:06 pm

dukebadboy wrote:I have same problem with gauges actually. I used to use Oxford tire pressure gauge, but it stopped giving me reliable readings. Sent from my MIX using Tapatalk


I would strongly urge you to FIRST buy a very accurate tire gauge, that only reads to [b]50psi max or the bar equivalent if that's your preference.[/b] Once you have this, ALWAYS handle it as though it were an uncooked egg, less you stand an excellent chance of throwing the calibration off, when dropping/throwing it, much like a torque wrench.

FWIW...I do not ride my bikes to maximize mpg, tire life, brake pad life, or any other consumables. That said, I also do not go out my way to simply beat the shit out of them either.

I'm 236lbs in clothes, and right at 250lbs in full track gear (leathers/gloves/boots/back protector/helmet.
The suggested tire pressure on any bike sold for street use, usually is with the understanding of the bike loaded with it's maximum permissable payload. If you find yourself riding solo, max psi, and spirited riding in the canyons/mountains will lead to unhappy results.

Even when I was shy of 200 lbs, 20 odd years ago, I would never run more than 36psi in the front tire, and 34-36psi max in the rear...cold. If you want hot PSI suggestions, I'm not the guy to ask.
Pick something, record it somewhere, and after a good hour long ride, check your tires, front and rear to see the wear changes if any, as well as decide whether the bike felt more planted, or worse. For street use, because of pavement irregularities, you wouldn't want to go much less than 34psi, if you are more than 180lbs...rim damage.
Ultimately you have to choose, there's no magic number, due to so many different factors in play,
how much you weigh/we get off payload
how you ride
environment
type of tire
type of bike
Etc.
Last edited by 5150 Pops on Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Tue Jun 20, 2017 8:27 pm

5150 Pops wrote:
I would strongly urge you to FIRST buy a very accurate tire gauge, that only reads to 50psi max or the bar equivalent if that's your preference. Once you have this, ALWAYS handle it as though it were an uncooked egg, less you stand an excellent chance of throwing the calibration off, when dropping/throwing it, much like a torque wrench.

FWIW...I do not ride my bikes to maximize mpg, tire life, brake pad life, or any other consumables. That said, I also do not go out my way to simply beat the shit out of them either.

I'm 236lbs in clothes, and right at 250lbs in full track gear (leathers/gloves/boots/back protector/helmet.
The suggested tire pressure on any bike sold for street use, usually is with the understanding of the bike loaded with it's maximum permissable payload. If you find yourself riding solo, max psi, and spirited riding in the canyons/mountains will lead to unhappy results.

Even when I was shy of 200 lbs, 20 odd years ago, I would never run more than 36psi in the front tire, and 34-36psi max in the rear...cold. If you want hot PSI suggestions, I'm not the guy to ask.
Pick something, record it somewhere, and after a good hour long ride, check your tires, front and rear to see the wear changes if any, as well as decide whether the bike felt more planted, or worse. For street use, because of pavement irregularities, you wouldn't want to go much less than 34psi, if you are more than 180lbs...rim damage.
Ultimately you have to choose, there's no magic number, due to so many different factors in play,
how much you weigh/we get off payload
how you ride
environment
type of tire
type of bike
Etc.


Thank you! That's very useful. Let me repeat the tests with Metzler.

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Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby 5150 Pops » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:41 pm

dukebadboy wrote:Thank you! That's very useful. Let me repeat the tests with Metzler.


No problem, glad you think so, but don't bother until you get a good tire gauge, you said yours sucks, so get a good one, or you will be wasting time.
A good tire gauge is usually not cheap. Fry has a very good one, (if its the one with hose and bleeder valve).

It doesn't have to be digital, but in my experience the more accurate gauges have a hose and bleeder valve attached. I have two, both are analog.

If your gauge is off by 3-4psi and your putting 38 in the tire, it could be you are actually putting 42psi in each.
:o
If your checking the pressure when the tires are hot, (after riding a good bit) and then adding pressure, you're gonna get hurt.
EDIT:
Always check cold, or at least after a few hours of NOT riding the bike, to get a more accurate measurement.

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby J-S » Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:33 am

dukebadboy wrote:
Fry wrote:I like the Pirelli Diablo Rosso III's

What about Super Corsa?

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The super corsa will melt super fast on the SDR and if you dont track your bike I don't see the need for it. I for myself prefer the rosso corsa and for street use it will be sticky plenty enough to push the limits far over than what should be done on public road anyway.

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Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:00 pm

5150 Pops wrote:[quote="dukebadboy"]
Thank you! That's very useful. Let me repeat the tests with Metzler.


No problem, glad you think so, but don't bother until you get a good tire gauge, you said yours sucks, so get a good one, or you will be wasting time.
A good tire gauge is usually not cheap. Fry has a very good one, (if its the one with hose and bleeder valve).

It doesn't have to be digital, but in my experience the more accurate gauges have a hose and bleeder valve attached. I have two, both are analog.

If your gauge is off by 3-4psi and your putting 38 in the tire, it could be you are actually putting 42psi in each.
:o
If your checking the pressure when the tires are hot, (after riding a good bit) and then adding pressure, you're gonna get hurt.
EDIT:
Always check cold, or at least after a few hours of NOT riding the bike, to get a more accurate measurement.
[/quote]
Changed the air gauge. Turned out rear was at 40psi cold, front is at 36psi.

Also what worries me, is uneven wear between front and rear. I put both tires at the same time, but rear is almost flat now whereas front is half worn.

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Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby Spiff » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:15 pm

My rule of thumb is two rears to a single front, as far as wear.

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Re: RE: Re: Something more sticky than Metzler M7RR

Postby dukebadboy » Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:17 pm

Spiff wrote:My rule of thumb is two rears to a single front, as far as wear.

Very good to know, thank you!

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